“Getting Involved in PRSA” from a New Pro

Getting fully involved in PRSA may seem like a scary thing – joining a new organization, let alone trying to be active in it isn’t always easy. If you’re anything like me, you may not feel like you should interject because you’re a new young professional and don’t feel like you have enough experience to be involved with practitioners of 15+ years. I am here to tell you that PRSA at the local, district, and national level are ready to welcome you with open arms! They are always looking for young professionals to be involved, because young professionals are the future of the profession and the organization.

If you’re interested in starting to do more than just attend meetings or follow PRSA social media channels, here’s how you can start!


Local Level

The first and probably most impactful way to get involved is to start with your local chapter. As a member of the Oklahoma City chapter and committee chair, my involvement got started when I moved to Oklahoma City in 2017. After attending a couple meetings, I decided I wanted to help serve the chapter. If you already have a connection with someone on the board, reach out to them and ask if there is somewhere you can serve. If you don’t know anyone (like I did), contact the chapter president. They’ll know exactly where the chapter needs the most help and will be willing to get you connected with the right people. Also, don’t forget to attend as many meetings/events as possible so you become a recognizable figure in your area!


District Level

Every PRSA chapter belongs to a district. Here in OKC, we belong to the Southwest District. When we’re able to attend in-person events again, keep an eye out for or ask your chapter leadership about district conferences. Most of the districts hold them annually, and it’s a great way to meet PR professionals in your area and get connected with all sorts of people. Because of my attendance at the last few Southwest District conferences, I am currently serving as the Treasurer of the Southwest District and am presenting at ICON with one of the connections I made!


National Level

There are many ways you can serve at the national level. Although it’s usually best to have some experience serving at lower levels, it never hurts to reach out to someone at the national level. For example, we are always looking for people to write for this newsletter and write for our blog. You may even want to submit something to Strategies & Tactics (PRSA’s national publication). If you’re interested in serving on the National New Pros Committee (I am the 2020 Membership Chair), reach out to one of us! We’ll be happy to point you in the right direction. Eventually you may even have the opportunity to serve on the National Executive Board.

As you can see, there are many ways to be involved in PRSA. It all starts with just asking! I highly suggest you attend as many meetings, conferences, and events as possible; especially ICON. If you’re not sure you can afford membership or conferences, check with your local chapter or district about scholarships. Also, ask your employer about paying for your membership – I promise you it’s a great investment and offers a multitude of professional development opportunities. The worst anyone can say is ‘no’ and you’ll never know until you ask!

How do you plan to get involved? Comment below or connect on LinkedIn to share your thoughts.

Landis Tindell

 

Landis Tindell is currently the Communications Coordinator for the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education in Oklahoma City, OK. He serves as the Professional Development Day committee chair for PRSA-OKC, the treasurer for the PRSA Southwest District, and as the Membership Chair for the National New Pros Committee.

Landis holds a Bachelor in Public Relations from Harding University and is pursuing a Masters Degree in Strategic Communication from Texas Tech University. Landis was named a 2019 PRNEWS 30 Under 30 Rising Star and the 2018 Young Professional of the Year by PRSA-OKC.

LinkedIn: Landis Tindell

 

“Development, Reflection and Union” from a New Pro

In these uncertain times, we should support each other. This current situation we find ourselves faced with has forced us to change our way of thinking. While for some of us this change was big, it was not so for others. Even so, it may yet affect your future. I personally believe there are three main factors that are essential to consider if it does: development, reflection and union.

In this post, I will analyze each of these separately so that you may call upon them as we all navigate the unique challenges our new normal creates.

  1. Development

Using the time that we previously did not have, or simply could not use efficiently, is currently possible as interactions turn virtual and work becomes remote. Being able to learn new things through online courses, webinars, reading or really any type of education is something very beneficial with the additional time you may suddenly have on your hands.

As a Public Relations professional, your career may concern many high-stress, quickly changing and even competitive elements. We should take advantage of every learning tool we can to develop our skills during these times of quiet to make a difference in our field when things inevitably speed back up.

  1. Reflection

Regardless of how we use our time, there is something we’ve been given in this situation: a pause.

This pause can be long or short depending on the situation. In my opinion, this is the ideal time to reflect. Try to perceive those things that maybe you didn’t see before.

As you reflect, it’s inevitable that one of those thoughts will be about your health. Indeed, health is the most important thing; it’s essential. In regards to this, I believe that we — as communicators — should use our talents to help represent the essential things in life, rather than the superficial. That we should go beyond what people expect from us, and rise above the typical.

More than anything, reflect on the priorities in your own life. Consider what really matters.

  1. Union

Thirdly, there must be union. Teamwork. Collaboration.

Is it easy? No. And yet teamwork is what solves most of our problems. Consider your own relationships, especially during this particular crisis. You’ve probably had to become very flexible, and maybe pitch — or listen to — more unconventional ideas while trying to navigate the unprecedented restraints we all find ourselves under.

In my opinion, your attitude is the best solution. And by the time this whole crisis is over, it’ll continue to be. Because in the end, an inclusive behavior toward others is always the best solution.

To conclude, I believe that we should remember that self-development, a little reflection on life and some good old fashioned teamwork are three essential aspects to consider — today, and in the future.

Do you agree? Comment below or connect on LinkedIn to share your thoughts.

Facundo Luque is a Young PR Professional from PRSA Argentina on the Communications Sub-Committee in the PRSA Diversity & Inclusion National Committee. He is currently working in an Argentinean public relations agency.

LinkedIn: Facundo Luque

Should You Do a Woke Campaign or Not?

Social media has an undeniable power to communicate, connect and inspire. For brands, social media is also a way to engage with, listen to and understand your audience for more effective campaigns.

Take Nike. One of the most recognizable brands in the world and no stranger to controversial campaigns, now called woke campaigns, that provoke social debates. In 2018, the brand decided to align a major campaign with Colin Kaepernick’s protest on social justice.

While most would find socially- or politically-charged campaigns to be a risky move, Nike had the upper hand – audience insight. Knowing that its target audience tends to be more liberal and socially conscientious, Nike found this campaign to be a risk worth taking.

Even within this very polarized social environment, if you know your target audience, and if you know your message is going to jibe well with your target audience, there is a greater chance that your PR campaign can really help your business.

I have researched Nike’s recent campaign, specifically focusing on how Nike’s target audience behaved on Twitter compared to the general U.S. public based on the six days of big Twitter data when most social conversations took place. While the campaign was not without negative pushback, the overall sentiment from the target audience was more positive than that of their target publics, and successfully positioned their brand at the center of social discussion. In sum, my study suggests that Nike had successfully energized its target audience, and later Nike reported on their increased sales in the initially troubled North America market.

Public relations practitioners should, however, weigh the risks and benefits before launching campaigns, especially those built around social issues.

As long as your target audience is getting the message and they are excited about your campaign, then it could eventually help your business and help your reputation and image.

Source: What does Corporate Social Advocacy (CSA) do for a brand? Twitter Analysis of Nike’s Kaepernick Campaign Case. Lee & Rim (2018).
5555555[1]YoungAh Lee is the director of the public relations graduate program with a diverse educational and professional background. Her research focuses on investigating the impact of strategic communication with an emphasis on reputation management and social media. Her approach to public relations emphasizes the role of reputation, believing that businesses best succeed when they align their communication and business goals. Recently, she has turned her focus to social network analysis to have a more theory-driven understanding of rich social media data while developing media analytics curriculum.

 

 

Ball State University was founded in 1918 and is located in Muncie, Indiana, 55 miles northeast of Indianapolis. At more than 22,500 students, enrollment for the 2017–18 academic year is Ball State’s largest ever. Students come from all Indiana counties, all 50 states and 68 countries. Ball State’s seven academic colleges offer 190 undergraduate majors, 130 undergraduate minors 140 graduate programs and 200 study abroad programs. Ball State students, faculty and staff are empowered in a culture that believes in them and demands they believe in themselves. Three of every four Ball State graduates choose to live, work and play in Indiana. Alumni hold leadership positions in businesses and communities across the state and the nation. Ball State has been named one of the best universities in the Midwest by The Princeton Review for more than a decade.

3 International Communications Lessons from a New Pro

Somehow, I was blessed to secure a global marketing communications role right out of college (okay, I worked at Panera for a few months beforehand, but, hey, it worked out). After being immersed in the literal world of communications for a few years, here are three things I learned as an international communicator.

  1. Non-traditional hours: the good and the bad

Whether it’s a call with China at 9pm (your time) or a 4am webinar with the Netherlands, some days and weeks will bring the strangest hours you’ve ever worked. There are plenty of pros to this weirdness, namely the excitement and flexibility that come with a non-traditional schedule. Working the nine to five grind can get repetitive; it’s nice to shake things up a little. Plus there’s a satisfying sense of intrigue when you can say you started the day by meeting with Europe. But be warned: while you may feel like 007 when you’re first starting out, you may also learn just how unrealistic Mr. Bond’s lifestyle is.

The obvious downers to odd hours include irregular sleep schedules, meetings at odd times, and a general lack of routine. The less obvious involve the quality and quantity of your work – tiredness and an unstable schedule can easily affect your productivity.

In addition to how you handle a non-traditional work schedule, be wary of your employers’ approach. Make sure any odd hours you log taking calls or traveling are accounted for as what they are – work time. If you’re putting in 40 hours at the office AND taking early morning calls or flying 20 hours in the same week, you might want to reevaluate your company’s culture around work-life balance. Having an international work schedule is fun and fine as long as it doesn’t quietly take over your personal time.

  1. The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is here (and kind of a good idea)

Personal time is important, and so is personal information. That’s why the GDPR exists and came to be fully enforced last year. In case you aren’t familiar, the basic premise of GDPR requires a new level of transparency and consent for marketers using consumer data. For example, if a customer registers for a newsletter by submitting their email, GDPR mandates the email address can only be used to send the newsletter. Unless the consumer explicitly opts into other communications, their information can’t be used for other tactics. Many companies in the US have already adopted this trend of opting-in, but this has been an optional courtesy rather than a legal requirement.

You’re probably wondering: how could a policy that cuts communications be good for marketers? In my opinion, these regulations lead to a better understanding of our audiences. By requiring consent, the ball is placed in the audience’s court. A GDPR set-up could make consumers more transparent because an audience’s decision to opt in or out of certain communications could say more than vague email open rates or website impressions. Plus, marketers operating under these types of policies might be forced to think more outside the box to reach their targets, and innovation is never a bad thing.

Even if you don’t agree about these possible positives, I learned there’s a real potential for more consumer-focused restrictions like GDPR to come into play, worldwide. It’s an important topic for new pros to be aware of as we enter the workforce and adapt our educations to the real world.

  1. Listening + asking questions = the secret sauce for international comm’s success

In my experience, American marketers move fast and feel they must be on the “cutting edge” 24/7. The success and adaptability our country’s communicators may lead you to believe Americans are fairly middle-of-the-road on a global scale, meaning we can work with foreign teams without much difficulty. This is only partially true at best.

I know from experience. My limited international experience and the company’s English-only policy resulted in my underestimation the effect cultural barriers can have on your communication skills. For example, I learned:

  • Just because some countries seem similar, doesn’t mean they are. Our colleagues in Italy and Spain stressed extremely different pain points after we introduced a global campaign to each office. Only after meeting with them one-on-one and taking the time to listen did we understand we couldn’t put Europe into a single bucket when developing a strategy.
  • “Cutting edge” is a fluid, global adjective. When our Thai colleagues shared a “cutting edge” social media strategy involving anime cartoon characters and egg-related recipes, my boss and I ended the call worried about the effect these tactics would have on our global campaign. After another call to question them, the Thai office graciously shared some amazing social engagement stats. We were floored and immediately learned to put more trust into foreign, “cutting edge” ideas.

I highly recommend The Culture Map by Erin Meyer to anyone interested in a global role – this book contains great data and personal insights as the author paints an experienced picture of how the world communicates.

If you’d like to share any lessons not included in this post, please comment or reach out to me. I always love discussing this topic.

Craig TierneyCraig Tierney is the Content Specialist for Kenzie Academy, an Indianapolis-based coding school + tech apprenticeship startup. He’s also a freelance Content Marketer through his business With It Communications. Craig’s international experience comes from a past role as Global Marketing Communications Specialist in the agricultural industry. Website: https://craigtierney.com/

 

Pro Bono Work: Professional Development for a Good Cause

By Elizabeth McGlone

My pro bono work for nonprofits started with a rejection letter.

I had applied for a position at a PR agency but wasn’t selected. I was disappointed but also determined to learn from the experience. My first step was to get advice about how to become a better job candidate for future opportunities. A contact at that same PR agency suggested

pro bono work as a great way to build my own skillsets while also helping an organization that was probably short-handed when it came to PR.

It was one of those, “Why didn’t I think of that?” moments.

Finding the right organization.

I began researching nonprofits in my area that do work for causes I am passionate about. One non-profit in particular stood out to me, National Alliance on Mental Illness, or NAMI, Indiana, and with my top choice in mind, I reached out to the organization.

NAMI was thrilled that I was interested in doing pro bono work for them! In fact, my point of contact had been a PR volunteer who later transitioned into a full-time role in their communications department.

Getting the right experience.

In my first conversations with NAMI, I made it clear that I was looking for an opportunity to gain experience in areas of PR that I hadn’t previously had exposure to, namely media relations.

Fortunately, this fit with NAMI’s needs and my timing was perfect. Their annual mental health and criminal justice summit was approaching and they needed help writing promotional content and getting media coverage.

The summit has since concluded, but it was incredibly satisfying to see the results of my hard work. I was tasked with finding media coverage of the event and secured a local reporter who published an article on the mental health program discussed in the workshop. This is publicity and attention that the program may not have received otherwise.

Working through the challenges.

Although my pro bono work for NAMI was extremely rewarding, it hasn’t been without its obstacles.

One of the biggest challenges was nurturing the relationship with NAMI and meeting the deadlines and goals that I set for myself. This wasn’t easy with a full-time job, other volunteer commitments, and my own hobbies that I also had to balance. NAMI’s employees also had their own responsibilities and it was my responsibility to maintain open lines of communication. I had to be proactive and persistent, providing updates on my tasks and asking for new ones. Each week I blocked out time on my calendar to work on NAMI-related items so I could make steady progress and meet deadlines.

Overall, my experience was enjoyable and invaluable to my professional development. It is fulfilling to know that my expertise is helping a cause I am passionate about, and it’s exciting to watch my skillsets grow. I’m excited to see how this opportunity grows and changes, and also what other opportunities the future holds.

What do you do to volunteer your PR services to nonprofits? What is most important to you when you look for a volunteer opportunity?

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Elizabeth McGlone a native Hoosier and a Digital Marketing Coordinator at Pinnacle Solutions Incorporated. She is an active member of the PRSA Hoosier Chapter, serves as a committee member of the Professional Development Special Events/Networking Committee, and is a co-chair for the New Pros Committee. In her spare time, Elizabeth does pro bono PR work for local nonprofits, including NAMI and Phi Beta Kappa Alpha Association of Indiana, and also enjoys biking and backpacking. You can connect with her on LinkedIn here.