Cut Out the Noise: Curate and prioritize your digital world

Cut Out the Noise

You have 10 minutes to read the many email newsletters you generously subscribe to and 10 minutes to spend on Instagram or Twitter hoping for a burst of creative inspiration to materialize before your next meeting or before you arrive at work. If 20 minutes were all the time you might spend consuming media in a day, how would your mindless scrolling change to actively engaging?

We accept that the media influences what importance the public places on events. In the same vein, what we see on social media has the power to tell our minds what is important. Why not curate a digital feed that piques and provokes your interest? Leave behind mindless scrolling. Take control of your digital feed and give yourself content that is motivating, inspiring and intriguing. 

Whether we call it a digital meditation to manifest the reality you want or a self-fulfilling prophecy, there’s power in actively selecting what you consume through social media, email or even news notifications. 

How to cut out the noise and curate your digital world? 

  1. Know the difference between content that is noise and content that is worth consuming. This definition is different for everyone. 
  2. Seek out the best of the best content. Follow the leading brands, thought leaders and newsmakers in your industry and similar industries. 
  3. Rather than scroll and ignore, unfollow and unsubscribe. 
  4. Create a routine, so that at the end of 20 minutes you are more knowledgeable or more inspired. 
  5. Revisit what interests and inspires you. If you find content put out by a brand or influencer, or even a friend, is not serving you or bringing you down, mute or unfollow that account. 

In the span of writing this blog, my email rang with six notifications, my phone binged with four text alerts, and news alerts came through for CNN, the local NBC station, and Twitter. Our world is indisputably cluttered with content. As creative professionals and communicators, we must be experts at cutting through the noise. 

Curate your feed and subscriptions to ideas, people, brands and news that intrigue and inspire you. You might find yourself ready to take on a new challenge, to dig deeper, or more energized to stay curious. 

New Pros Recommend: Podcasts

Not quite an audio book and not quite talk radio, podcasts are the next great commuter companion. There are currently over 750,000 podcasts with more than 30 million episodes according to an article from Podcast Insights updated in June 2019. The same article reported that more than half the U.S. population has listened to a podcast.

The variety of podcasts has grown so much over the last few years, there is something out there for everyone and every interest. Podcasts can be informational, entertaining, suspenseful, investigative and so much more. Below are a few podcast recommendations from PRSA New Pros members.

Podcast: The Daily

Summary: This is how the news should sound. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, hosted by Michael Barbaro and powered by New York Times journalism.

Recommended by: Arielle Schrader, Senior Account Executive, Small Girls PR

Why you should listen: “I listen to The Daily because politics are overwhelming to me and they do a great job of recapping recent political news in layman’s terms!”

Podcast: Hello Monday

Summary: A show where senior editor at large Jessi Hempel investigates the changing nature of work, and how that work is changing us. What does work mean to us? Should we love what we do? Join Jessi as she talks with guests such as Seth Meyers, Elizabeth Gilbert, and Melinda Gates to unearth lessons that apply to our own careers. These conversations are enriched by original reporting by LinkedIn’s managing editor, Caroline Fairchild.

Recommended by: Robyn Rudish-Laning, Senior Marketing & Communications Manager, Airports Council International – North America

Why Robyn recommends Hello Monday: “I love Hello Monday from LinkedIn because it features guests across a variety of industries to discuss ‘how we’re changing the nature of work, and how that work is changing us.’ It’s great to hear from people about their own career journeys and discussions and topics have sparked new ideas for me on a lot of things, from how to handle obstacles in the office to making my own new opportunities and a whole lot more.”

Podcast: How I Built This

Summary: Guy Raz dives into the stories behind some of the world’s best known companies. How I Built This weaves a narrative journey about innovators, entrepreneurs and idealists—and the movements they built.

Recommended by: Emma Finkbeiner, Digital Media Coordinator, Chicago Cubs

Why you should listen:

“How I Built This is both inspiring and fascinating. Inspiring because it makes you realize that some of the most well-known brands, companies and founders had a journey full of challenges before they achieved success. Fascinating because the stories behind Warby Parker, Lyft, Whole Foods, Stitch Fix and more will surprise you.”

Podcast: WorkLife

Summary: Organizational psychologist Adam Grant takes you inside the minds of some of the world’s most unusual professionals to explore the science of making work not suck. From learning how to love criticism to harnessing the power of frustration, one thing’s for sure: You’ll never see your job the same way again.

Recommended by: Sarah G. Dougherty, Associate, Financial Services

Why Sarah recommends WorkLife: “WorkLife makes you think outside the box. I love it because it addresses common workplace challenges and career themes, but incorporates unique perspectives that come together to make strong points and tangible takeaways for everyday life, no matter what your career path may be. I listen on my walk to work and find myself excited and already thinking about ways to apply what Adam Grant and the guests have discussed that day. A recent episode called ‘Become friends with your rivals’ incorporates the role of competition in success that was really captivating, but you really can’t go wrong with any of the episodes!”

Should You Do a Woke Campaign or Not?

Social media has an undeniable power to communicate, connect and inspire. For brands, social media is also a way to engage with, listen to and understand your audience for more effective campaigns.

Take Nike. One of the most recognizable brands in the world and no stranger to controversial campaigns, now called woke campaigns, that provoke social debates. In 2018, the brand decided to align a major campaign with Colin Kaepernick’s protest on social justice.

While most would find socially- or politically-charged campaigns to be a risky move, Nike had the upper hand – audience insight. Knowing that its target audience tends to be more liberal and socially conscientious, Nike found this campaign to be a risk worth taking.

Even within this very polarized social environment, if you know your target audience, and if you know your message is going to jibe well with your target audience, there is a greater chance that your PR campaign can really help your business.

I have researched Nike’s recent campaign, specifically focusing on how Nike’s target audience behaved on Twitter compared to the general U.S. public based on the six days of big Twitter data when most social conversations took place. While the campaign was not without negative pushback, the overall sentiment from the target audience was more positive than that of their target publics, and successfully positioned their brand at the center of social discussion. In sum, my study suggests that Nike had successfully energized its target audience, and later Nike reported on their increased sales in the initially troubled North America market.

Public relations practitioners should, however, weigh the risks and benefits before launching campaigns, especially those built around social issues.

As long as your target audience is getting the message and they are excited about your campaign, then it could eventually help your business and help your reputation and image.

Source: What does Corporate Social Advocacy (CSA) do for a brand? Twitter Analysis of Nike’s Kaepernick Campaign Case. Lee & Rim (2018).
5555555[1]YoungAh Lee is the director of the public relations graduate program with a diverse educational and professional background. Her research focuses on investigating the impact of strategic communication with an emphasis on reputation management and social media. Her approach to public relations emphasizes the role of reputation, believing that businesses best succeed when they align their communication and business goals. Recently, she has turned her focus to social network analysis to have a more theory-driven understanding of rich social media data while developing media analytics curriculum.

 

 

Ball State University was founded in 1918 and is located in Muncie, Indiana, 55 miles northeast of Indianapolis. At more than 22,500 students, enrollment for the 2017–18 academic year is Ball State’s largest ever. Students come from all Indiana counties, all 50 states and 68 countries. Ball State’s seven academic colleges offer 190 undergraduate majors, 130 undergraduate minors 140 graduate programs and 200 study abroad programs. Ball State students, faculty and staff are empowered in a culture that believes in them and demands they believe in themselves. Three of every four Ball State graduates choose to live, work and play in Indiana. Alumni hold leadership positions in businesses and communities across the state and the nation. Ball State has been named one of the best universities in the Midwest by The Princeton Review for more than a decade.

Three Ways to Get Involved With Your Local PRSA Chapter

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Graduation is around the corner and the job search is on! But what happens after you secure your first gig? It is important to stay involved in professional organizations like PRSA even after graduation for continued professional development and networking. Here are three ways that you can get involved in your local PRSA chapter:

  1. ALL ABOARD!

A great way to get involved with your local chapter is to join the board. This allows you to plan the best year yet for the local chapter. Whether you want to be the historian or happy hour coordinator (like me), you are in a space where you can contribute ideas on programming and network closely with like-minded individuals.

  1. Be Hands On

If you’re not ready to be a board member yet, volunteering is a great way to start getting involved. There are fundraising events, award ceremonies and networking mixers that need planning and support. Contact your local chapter to see how you can play a part.

  1. Show Up!

Beth Lamb, Chief Marketing Officer at Ronald McDonald House Fort Worth (TX) said “it can be very easy to get involved with your local chapter, and the easiest way is to simply attend chapter programming. Get to know your fellow members and leadership board through the various events. If you are ready to serve the chapter, ask. Boards always love to know who is ready and willing to fill committee chairs. If your schedule does not allow you to do more than attend programs, offer your ideas on luncheon topics or event programming.”

PRSA is a great way to enrich your professional life through networking and career development. “Plus, your involvement, no matter the level, is important to your growth and the growth of your local chapter,” said Lamb. Find your local chapter today at PRSA

By – Jade Fails

Jade Fails is a Baylor University public relations graduate. She is currently the Marketing Administrator at The Shops at Clearfork in Fort Worth, TX. 

New Year, New Pros

Each year, the turning of the calendar marks a time of transition for the New Professionals Section. In the weeks leading up to the holidays, the incoming and outgoing committee chairs begin the transition with a flurry of calls, messages and documents exchanged. And then we set off to plan.

When I started digging in to planning back in September, I found there was a lot I didn’t know. Despite being a member of the Section for four years and on the Exec Committee for three, I had a hard time articulating what our goals were. As a committee, we had always done a pretty good job of executing on our individual goals, but we didn’t have a strategic plan or overall goals guiding our work.

As I began the process of meeting with current committee members to select the 2019 Executive Committee, I heard a lot of the same struggles – members weren’t sure what we were working towards or didn’t feel like we had a clear mission or goals to guide us – and decided that we needed a strategic plan. With guidance from other sections and groups, as well as other more experienced professionals, I began to craft a strategic plan for our New Professionals Section with three clear goals that our committee would work toward in 2019.

They are:

  1. Provide valuable tools and resources for professional development to our members;
  2. Position our Section and our members as thought leaders; and
  3. Clearly demonstrate the value of being a PRSA and New Pros member.

Why these three goals? Well, there are a few reasons. First, they are inline with PRSA’s Strategic Plan. Second, they address feedback we’ve heard from members over the past couple of years and are speak to our mission and vision for the Section – to serve members by helping them grow professionally. That is, after all, why we join professional organizations, right?

When it comes to professional development, the needs of new professionals vary a bit from those of mid-level and experienced practitioners. While leadership training is great, and can often be useful, many of us are working towards the next promotion or the next job, and trying to figure out what skills and knowledge we need to have to get there. Maybe we don’t see ourselves as leaders yet because we’re not sure we know the things we need to know or are asking the right questions.

There are two things new pros seem to need to develop professionally – access to opportunities that provide actionable resources they can use pretty much immediately and guidance. This year, we’re going to tackle both.

Through a partnership with PRSA’s College of Fellows, we will make mentoring more accessible to new professionals. Mentors are crucial to professional development and the mentor/mentee relationship is unique. Experienced professionals often have a wealth of knowledge they’re more than happy to share with aspiring and new professionals and their guidance on navigating through career obstacles is invaluable. Mentoring is a two-way relationship, though, and nurturing and maintaining that relationship may not always come naturally. As we partner with the College of Fellows, we’ll explore not only the benefits of having and being a mentor, but what really goes into the relationship, what to expect and how it changes over the course of your career.

Since January is National Mentoring Month, we decided to dive right in and begin the conversation with a joint webinar on Jan. 31 at 3 p.m. ET. This webinar,Supercharge your career: How finding or being a mentor can transform your professional development,” is only available to members of the New Professionals Section and the College of Fellows and will feature two mentor-mentee pairs who will share the ins and outs for fostering a mutually beneficial mentoring relationship. We hope you’ll join us for this discussion.

Actionable resources, like checklists, templates and guides, are something we’ll be working on bringing to our professional development opportunities this year, starting with our Summits.

Last year, we hosted our first in-person networking and learning summit, “Careers in Progress” in New York City. The event was a success, bringing together new professionals from across the country and industry professionals to talk about practical tactics and insights. This year, we’re expanding our summits to three different locations over the course of the year – Silicon Valley, Washington, D.C., and Chicago. In addition to sessions on tactics and trends, we’ll be adding an afternoon workshop to help attendees master a skill. We’re still working on planning each of these events, so keep an eye out for an announcement on dates and programs for each.

“Thought leader” may not be the first word you’d use to describe yourself as a new professional, but our members are skilled in many areas and we want to help showcase these talents. Our blog, The Edge, is an excellent platform for sharing information, tips and ideas. We encourage all members to flex your skills by writing for The Edge and use published posts to build your portfolio.

Professional development and being a thought leader aren’t just limited to talking about skills and successes, though. We all struggle sometimes and struggle a bit through our career. No one will be better able to relate to and understand the obstacles new pros face than your peers. The Edge is also a good place to talk about those issues and topics that are important to you as you make your way through your early career.

We hope that you’ll see the value in being a PRSA member – and a Section member – as a new professional through the opportunities that are made available to you, but we’re also going to do a better job at showcasing some of the benefits to being a New Pros member and the value that we find in it. One way we’ll do this is by better sharing some of the more behind-the-scenes projects that we’re working on to improve our Section. We want you to be just as excited about being a new pro as we are.

We look forward to what’s ahead this year and to better getting to know you. We want to hear from you, so whether you’ve got a question that needs an answer, a success you’d like to share or an idea for something we can do better, please reach out to us on our social media channels, through our MyPRSA discussion forum, or directly to me by email.

Happy 2019, new pros!

– Robyn
  2019 PRSA New Professionals Section Chair